design

Dassault Systèmes x Morphosis

Design in the Age of Experience


Anne Asensio of Dassault Systèmes speaks to Thom Mayne and Kerenza Harris from Morphosis about their collaboration on the "Interfaces" installation during Milan Design Week in April 2019

In the run-up to their collaborative installation Interfaces - set to be revealed during Milan Design Week in April 2019 - Dassault Systèmes and Morphosis discuss the interplay between science, art and design and the role of data and design thinking when applied to real-world issues facing urban environments today and in the future.

During Milan Design Week 2019, Dassault Systèmes returns to the exhibition space Superstudio Più. This is the leading 3D design software company’s latest collaboration with influential members of the design community, to reinforce its mission to create a more sustainable, resilient and regenerative world through design.

Dassault Systèmes’ event “Design in the Age of Experience” examines how pioneering innovations can drive change in our cities, mobility networks, energy use, and daily endeavors to reduce humankind’s damaging impact on our planet. Visitors are encouraged to experience solutions provided by Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform through a varied program of activities throughout the week.

Architects and designers are defining our habitat, our living experiences. In a ‘now’ hybrid, data enabled, mixed virtual and real environment, Morphosis’ installation is projecting a regenerative future by questioning our relation to the world.”

Anne Asensio,…
Vice President of Design Experience & Innovation, Dassault Systèmes

“Interfaces” by Morphosis

Following the success of the 2018 collaboration with global thought leaders Kengo Kuma, Daan Roosegaarde, Wesley Goatley and Superflux, this year’s Design in the Age of Experience will feature “Inter faces,” an immersive installation created in collaboration with Los Angeles-based architecture practice Morphosis.

Thom Mayne, Kerenza Harris and Eric Meyer of Morphosis will reveal this interactive experience examining the role of design thinking when applied to real-world issues facing urban environments today and in the future. The exhibition takes as its content real models and data from Morphosis’ projects, designed with Dassault Systèmes’ software solutions. Using augmented reality and digital projection, “Interfaces“ immerses viewers in an interplay of data and decisions embedded in the contemporary design process.

Animated rotating panels are transformed into interfaces that connect human experience to contemporary design environments: solar and energy efficiency studies, human experience parameters such as interior climate, material economies, production streams and the building’s relationship to its urban context.

Thom Mayne, Principal Founder, Morphosis Architects

Thom Mayne, Principal Founder, Morphosis Architects

The installation is part of an ongoing collaborative merging of digital work - that’s Dassault Systèmes’ world - and the world we work in as architects. It represents the alignment of these two worlds, an alignment that entails a different definition of who architects are and how they contribute to the
world. Through this alignment, there is clear opportunity for a radical expansion of our role to address broader urban infrastructure, global social and environmental issues, and large scale projects. But the dialogue is essential. We wouldn’t operate under the same terms without this collaboration.”

Thom Mayne, Principal Founder, Morphosis Architects

This open conversation as part of Dassault Systèmes' varied conference program during Milan Design Week
INTERFACES : Discover the Morphosis Installation
Daily from 11.30am to 12.15pm

RIBA International Prize 2018 - The world’s best new building Brazilian school

Children Village, a new school complex on the edge of the rainforest in northern Brazil designed by Brazilian architects, Aleph Zero and Rosenbaum, has won the RIBA International Prize 2018. 

The RIBA International Prize is awarded every two years to a building that exemplifies design excellence and architectural ambition, and delivers meaningful social impact. It is one of the world’s most rigorously judged architecture awards, with every longlisted building visited by a group of international experts.  Children Village was chosen from a shortlist of four exceptional new buildings by a grand jury chaired by renowned architect Elizabeth Diller (DS+R).

The architects, Gustavo Utrabo and Petro Duschenes from Aleph Zero, designed Children Village in collaboration with Marcelo Rosenbaum and Adriana Benguela from architecture and design studio, Rosenbaum. 

The tropical climate, with summertime temperature in the mid-40 degrees, was one of the major challenges cleverly addressed by the architects. The large canopy roof, the structure of which is made up of cross-laminated timber beams and columns, provides shading. The overhanging canopy design has created an intermediary space, between inside and out, giving the effect of a large veranda overlooking the surrounding landscape and creating a comfortable environment with no need for air conditioning. 

Combining a contemporary aesthetic with traditional techniques, Children Village has been described by the judges as ‘reinventing Brazilian vernacular’. The building is constructed with local resources and based on local techniques. Earth blocks handmade on site were used to construct the walls and latticework, chosen for their thermal, technical and aesthetic properties. As well as being cost effective and environmentally sustainable, this approach creates a building with strong connections to its surroundings and with the community that it serves.

Children Village

Children Village provides boarding accommodation for 540 children aged 13 to 18 attending the Canuanã School. Pupils come from remote areas of the country, some travelling many hours by boat. Funded by the Bradesco Foundation, Children Village is one of forty schools run by the foundation providing education for children in rural communities across Brazil.

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